Tag Archives: nutrition coach

Who doesn’t love curry? Indian curry? Thai curry? Burmese? The beauty of curry lies not in its intoxicating aroma, its vibrant color or its satiating, silky texture. The true elegance resides in its rejuvenating properties from the number of healing spices used to create the bold and deep flavor.

Short of eating spices like turmeric, curry, cardamom, cumin, ginger and holy basil every day, I highly recommend taking a supplement like Boswellia or Vitanox from MediHerbs. Fantastic supplement for an active, independent lifestyle. 💪  (Call me to order some for yourself or your family members (UPS 8.50)).

This recipe makes 8 servings (& is 100% Paleo consistent.) We ate two soup bowls of it (each) — and there is enough for at least four more bowls! So flavorful. So nourishing. (It’s even better reheated, so make the full recipe below and you’ll thank me as you’re enjoying the leftovers…)

Chicken Curry
Ingredients:
3 green zucchinis
2 crookneck squash
4 carrots
40 green beans (2 handfuls)
2 chicken breasts cubed
16 oz chicken broth or chicken bone broth
homemade coconut milk (double the recipe below)
zest of half a lime
2 tbsp olive oil

Spices:
1 table spoon of Sumac
2 dry leaves of green lime
1 stick of cinnamon
3 cloves
1 stalk of lemon grass slightly prechopped
1 large piece of ginger (peeled)
2 pieces fresh tumeric (peeled)
1 clove of garlic
1 small shallot
a handful of basil

  • Chop veggies in 2 inch cubes and cut green beans in thirds.
  • Saute in olive oil and salt to taste. Be careful not to overcook.
  • Pour into the coconut milk and add two large tablespoons of curry powder (for fresh spices in bulk, I highly recommend the @rainbow_grocery bulk section). Make a paste in a small food processor with the remaining spices listed above, lime zest and olive oil.
  • Add the paste to the coconut milk mixture, simmer for ten minutes.
  • Add the veggies and bring to simmer.
  • At last add two breasts of cubed chicken and simmer for 5 minutes. (Careful not to overcook/dry out the chicken.)

Top with lime juice and cilantro. Voila! Bon apetit!

Homemade Coconut Milk

  • Add 1c unsweetened @coconut flakes to 2c water in your blender.
  • Turn on high for 3 minutes.
  • Pour liquid into a cheesecloth or strainer bag and squeeze the pulp.
  • Discard the pulp (or make coconut flour with it) and you’re done. (Use a 1.5c coconut to 3c water ratio for a creamier result.)
To everyone who is about to ‘finish’ (or has finished) the Standard Process 21 Day Cleanse or the Whole 30 Program, I want to first and foremost congratulate you. Well done!

These congratulations are not, however, for merely doing the program. Instead, they are compliments for making a commitment to your health. Fortunately for all of us, the journey begins with the Standard Process Cleanse, or any other program you might have completed, but extends beyond these three weeks.

The next steps are important to continuing this commitment to your health. Many call this phase the ‘reintroduction phase’. During the next few weeks, you will begin to add back the foods that you eliminated during your cleanse. You might have even added a few back already! Maybe you celebrated this morning with a bacon and pancake brunch extravaganza! But a word of caution about this…

By doing the cleanse program, we tried to create a situation in which we can observe how the foods we eat might contribute to some of our symptoms. Some foods might simply be preventing us from feeling our best. Eliminating foods to ‘restart’ our system, gives us the perfect opportunity to make these observations.

When you’re reintroducing food groups back into your diet, it’s critical to add each food back, one at a time, in small amounts, so that you may observe how they make you feel. You may find that foods you have eaten for years cause bloating, pimples or even headaches. You may also find that food combinations are bothersome to your digestive system. By introducing each food or food group one by one, you can easily identify which foods are causing duress. If you introduce too many at once, you may find yourself feeling unwell – and you will be unable to pinpoint which food caused the issue.

I would love my clients to share with me how their experience has been thus far, via email. With these insights, I can make a recommendation for a more personalized program for the next step in their wellness journey. First and foremost, it’s most important to make note what has improved, or not. Maintaining a food journal during the reintroduction phase will be helpful in keeping track of what foods cause symptoms, and which do not. It’s best to make note of: difference in digestion (subtle or dramatic), sleep, mood, skin, join pain, etc.

In the link below Melissa Hartwig from the Whole30 Program, writes a detailed description of what she coins “Reintro 101”. There is a fast-track plan and a Slow-Roll plan, each outlined with Pros and Cons. I encourage you all to take a look, so that you can feel empowered to reintroduce foods back into your diet, while still maintaining optimal health – for your physical and mental well-being.

Whole 30 Reintroduction