Category Archives: Recipe

Who doesn’t love curry? Indian curry? Thai curry? Burmese? The beauty of curry lies not in its intoxicating aroma, its vibrant color or its satiating, silky texture. The true elegance resides in its rejuvenating properties from the number of healing spices used to create the bold and deep flavor.

Short of eating spices like turmeric, curry, cardamom, cumin, ginger and holy basil every day, I highly recommend taking a supplement like Boswellia or Vitanox from MediHerbs. Fantastic supplement for an active, independent lifestyle. 💪  (Call me to order some for yourself or your family members (UPS 8.50)).

This recipe makes 8 servings (& is 100% Paleo consistent.) We ate two soup bowls of it (each) — and there is enough for at least four more bowls! So flavorful. So nourishing. (It’s even better reheated, so make the full recipe below and you’ll thank me as you’re enjoying the leftovers…)

Chicken Curry
Ingredients:
3 green zucchinis
2 crookneck squash
4 carrots
40 green beans (2 handfuls)
2 chicken breasts cubed
16 oz chicken broth or chicken bone broth
homemade coconut milk (double the recipe below)
zest of half a lime
2 tbsp olive oil

Spices:
1 table spoon of Sumac
2 dry leaves of green lime
1 stick of cinnamon
3 cloves
1 stalk of lemon grass slightly prechopped
1 large piece of ginger (peeled)
2 pieces fresh tumeric (peeled)
1 clove of garlic
1 small shallot
a handful of basil

  • Chop veggies in 2 inch cubes and cut green beans in thirds.
  • Saute in olive oil and salt to taste. Be careful not to overcook.
  • Pour into the coconut milk and add two large tablespoons of curry powder (for fresh spices in bulk, I highly recommend the @rainbow_grocery bulk section). Make a paste in a small food processor with the remaining spices listed above, lime zest and olive oil.
  • Add the paste to the coconut milk mixture, simmer for ten minutes.
  • Add the veggies and bring to simmer.
  • At last add two breasts of cubed chicken and simmer for 5 minutes. (Careful not to overcook/dry out the chicken.)

Top with lime juice and cilantro. Voila! Bon apetit!

Homemade Coconut Milk

  • Add 1c unsweetened @coconut flakes to 2c water in your blender.
  • Turn on high for 3 minutes.
  • Pour liquid into a cheesecloth or strainer bag and squeeze the pulp.
  • Discard the pulp (or make coconut flour with it) and you’re done. (Use a 1.5c coconut to 3c water ratio for a creamier result.)
Most of the food we cook in our home are “belly friendly”, designed for people who have some digestive challenges.

For many of our recipes, one can add garlic and onions (for example in the recipes listed below). It will be more tasty and these two ingredients are good for your health.
I find in my practice that people might eat onion and garlic because they are regarded as very healthy, which is true, but they might not work for everyone. If you have chronic discomfort like bloating in your gut, try to avoid them, or compromise by using in very small amounts: one clove of garlic for the entire rack of lamb, for example (at least until we figure out how to strengthen your digestive system).

Instead, we try to use a variety of spices to enrich flavor and compliment ingredients. Some might think that without garlic and onions, our options are somewhat reduced. However, there are a plethora of herbs and spices, when used in combinations, can give the same satisfying flavors that garlic and onions can impart in recipes. Last night we used plenty of rosemary. This was not only a good marriage of flavor with the lamb, but also rosemary is an excellent source of anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal properties.

We had two white veggies tonight, which did not yield the greatest color combo for a visually and aesthetically appealing meal. We added our leftover carrot soup to the white cauliflower soup for two reasons: (1) for a zing! of orange and (2) to finish the leftovers. It’s important to have a variety of colors in your plate, both for visual enjoyment and for meridian balancing (more on that soon!)

 

Cauliflower Soup

Wash and cut cauliflower in to small pieces
Place in pot and cover with chicken stock
Boil until cauliflower is soft
Using an immersion blender, blend until smooth
Add 1 Tablespoon of butter
Season with salt and pepper
For added flavor you can also saute onion and garlic and add it to the pot before cooking the cauliflower

Sauteed Celery Root

Peel celery root and clean thoroughly
Cut into pieces about the size of French fries
Boil in salted water until semi soft, about 10 minutes
Drain and sauce in butter or olive oil

Crown Lamb Chops

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Pat meat dry
Season with salt and pepper
Place meat fat side down in frying pan and brown (about 10 minutes)
Mince one clove of garlic and spread over fat side of meat
chop 2 tablespoons of rosemary and sprinkle over meat
Place in oven and cook 20 minutes for rare, 135 degrees, 25 minutes medium rare, 140 degrees etc.

Cauliflower SoupRoasted Lamb with Celery Root

Dinner Day 19 on cleanse

 

Life can get hectic around the holidays and in light of recent events, we could all use a little more tender, love and care. Cooking a healthy meal may not top your to-do list every night, but in under twenty minutes, you can have a hot, nourishing bowl of stew each night…or each morning.

With a small amount of prep, you can make sufficient soup to last you at least half the week. This recipe is so delicious, in fact, that I’ve made it three Sundays in a row. Not to mention, it’s highly customizeable to suit your taste. I am planning to do it once a week for the entire winter. You can replace/alternate the Oxtail, short ribs or shank with a whole chicken.

Nutritionally, it is hard to match. You end up with an “all in one” dish coverage essential nutritional needs.

I will mention only a few

  • Bone broth with all the great mineral content
  • Highly digestible protein
  • Great amount of gelatin/collagen which is really hard to find any other way: fantastic for hair, nails, skin, joints and for repairing the digestive tract
  • Healthy saturated fat which will feed your nervous system/brain. (Fats may have had a bad rap before, but they’re truly good for you! DO NOT SKIM the fat off this dish!)

The combo protein/fat is so satisfactory, it will also curb your sweet tooth for the holidays.

What could you be waiting for?

Enjoy and be well.


Recipe: Oxtail Soup

1 1/2 lbs of short ribs or shank*
(ONLY use grass fed organic)
3 lbs oxtail*
(ONLY grass fed organic)
1 spoon of apple cider vinegar.
3 turnips
1 rutabaga
2 parsnips
5 carrots
3 celery stalks
*organic, grass-fed
1/2 butternut squash
2 shallots
thyme
sea salt
ginger
Herbs de Provence
parsley
avocado

Brown meat and tail in olive oil with thyme and shallots (about 20 minutes).  While meat is browning, chop all vegetables into bite-size chunks.  Place veggies and meat in large pot and fill with salted water.  Add more thyme and grated ginger and Herbs de Provence (several tablespoons of each).  Bring to a boil and then turn down to simmer for 8-15 hours.  Remove all bones and thyme sprigs.  Serve with fresh parsley and sliced avocado.

I put mine in mason jars one per day. I make sure there are pretty even amount of meat, veggies and fat in each.


Customize!

If you have the stamina to keep chopping once your pot is simmering on the stove, below are some great fresh additions to throw in the pot when reheating for meals. You can always chop an entire bunch of cilantro, green onions, etc and save in containers in the refrigerator. When you reheat the soup, add a handful and you’re good to go. Adding fresh veggies can make it feel like you’re eating a new soup each night!

  • Cilantro
  • Italian parsley
  • Green Onions
  • Fresh Ginger – thinly sliced with a mandolin
  • Grated Carrots
  • Chard or Kale – chopped in small pieces

Adding additional herbs can have medicinal effects as well. Suffering from inflammation? Add a pinch of turmeric and black pepper — the turmeric is great for inflammation and when paired with black pepper, it’s more readily absorbed into the body. Feel like a cold might be coming on? Add 1 tsp holy basil or Tulsi. Known as the sacred basil, Tulsi is great for respiratory issues and some even believe it to boost energy. You can also increase amount of ginger in the broth if you’re suffering from gastrointestinal issues.

Bon appetit.

PS: Let me know if you made it and liked it 🙂

 

img_1131OxtailOxtail SimmeringChopped VeggiesSimmering SoupBone Broth